She Was the Quiet One by Michele Campbell

She Was the Quiet One by Michele Campbell

For Rose Enright, enrolling in a prestigious New England boarding school is the opportunity of a lifetime. But for Rose’s vulnerable twin sister Bel, Odell Academy is a place of temptation and danger. When Bel falls in with a crowd of wild rich kids who pressure her into hazing Rose, the sisters’ relationship is shattered. Rose turns to her dorm mother, Sarah Donovan, for advice. But Bel turns to Sarah’s husband Heath, a charismatic and ambitious teacher. Is Heath trying to help Bel or take advantage of her? In a world of privilege, seduction, and manipulation, only one sister will live to tell the truth.

In a novel full of twists, turns, and dark secrets, Michele Campbell once again proves her skill at crafting intricately spun and completely compelling plots. (publisher)

When their mother dies, twins Rose and Bel move in with their grandmother who they barely know. They are sent to The Odell Academy, a boarding school for the rich kids, where the academic Rose fits right in, but the wilder Bel becomes friends with the popular kids, but the friendship comes with a price. Bel has a crush on Heath Donovan, an ambitious teacher, which sets her against the older popular kids.

The book has some Gossip Girl vibes and I have to say that I hated all the characters. I wanted to know what happens but didn’t feel much sympathy for any of the people.

The book starts with a murder, but we don’t know who died or who did it. Unfortunately, it wasn’t too difficult to guess who it was, but it takes the cops waay to much time to get it or understand at all what goes on in the school. So much eye-rolling here…

It was a solid read, but I had higher hopes for this one.

3/5

Published: St. Martin’s Press (July 31, 2018)
Format: ebook
Source: Netgalley

The King’s Justice by E.M. Powell

The King’s Justice (Stanton & Barling #1) by E.M. Powell

A murder that defies logic—and a killer on the loose.

England, 1176. Aelred Barling, esteemed clerk to the justices of King Henry II, is dispatched from the royal court with his young assistant, Hugo Stanton, to investigate a brutal murder in a village outside York.

The case appears straightforward. A suspect is under lock and key in the local prison, and the angry villagers are demanding swift justice. But when more bodies are discovered, certainty turns to doubt—and amid the chaos it becomes clear that nobody is above suspicion.

Facing growing unrest in the village and the fury of the lord of the manor, Stanton and Barling find themselves drawn into a mystery that defies logic, pursuing a killer who evades capture at every turn.

Can they solve the riddle of who is preying upon the villagers? And can they do it without becoming prey themselves?

Hugo Stanton is selected to assist Aelred Barling, appointed clerk of the court, to solve a mysterious death in Claresham. The start is not easy for the two very different men working together and both having secrets of their own. Stanton, in particular, isn’t happy having to work for the king.

Stanton appeared on the Fifth Knight novels, which I enjoyed, but I have to confess that I don’t remember him. It was frustrating at times trying to remember since there are references to the past.

Stanton and Barling are very different personalities and at first, it causes difficulties. Barling does everything by the book and Stanton is more of an improviser. I liked to see how they learned to work with each other and started to respect each other. I loved to read about the normal life since the books I’ve read usually centers at the royal court or something.

It was great to learn more about how the justice system worked in 12th century. I certainly wouldn’t like to be accused of anything in those times.

I enjoyed the book and can’t wait for the next book. Good start for a new series.

3,5/5

Published: Thomas & Mercer (June 1, 2018)
Format: Paperback
Pages: 288
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Author

E.M. Powellís historical thriller Fifth Knight novels have been #1 Amazon and Bild bestsellers. The Kingís Justice is the first novel in her new Stanton and Barling medieval murder mystery series. She is a contributing editor to International Thriller Writersí The Big Thrill magazine, blogs for English Historical Fiction Authors and is the social media manager for the Historical Novel Society.

Born and raised in the Republic of Ireland into the family of Michael Collins (the legendary revolutionary and founder of the Irish Free State), she now lives in North-West England with her husband, daughter and a Facebook-friendly dog.

Find out more by visiting www.empowell.com. You can also find him on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Friday, June 1
Interview at Passages to the Past

Monday, June 4
Review at Donna’s Book Blog

Wednesday, June 6
Review at The Writing Desk

Thursday, June 7
Feature at Encouraging Words from the Tea Queen

Tuesday, June 12
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Wednesday, June 13
Guest Post at Jathan & Heather

Saturday, June 16
Review at Clarissa Reads it All

Friday, June 22
Review at Broken Teepee

Wednesday, June 27
Review at Hoover Book Reviews
Feature at The Lit Bitch

Monday, July 2
Interview at Reading the Past

Tuesday, July 3
Feature at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Thursday, July 5
Review at Bri’s Book Nook

Friday, July 6
Guest Post at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Monday, July 9
Review at A Book Geek

Wednesday, July 11
Review at Jaffa Reads Too

Friday, July 13
Review at Bookramblings
Review at A Darn Good Read

Secrets of the Island by Linda Hughes

Secrets of the Island (The Secrets Trilogy Book 2) by Linda Hughes

Do you think you know your heritage? Think again. Dark secrets lurk below the surface of every family tree, as the Sullivan clan discovers in this story about living in the aftermath of generations of deceit.

When Red Cross nurse Harriet escapes the trauma of World War II and sequesters herself in her grandfather’s cottage on Mackinac Island, she has no inkling about her heritage. But as one shocking clue after another surface – disclosing lies, corruption, madness, and murder – she realizes her family isn’t what, or who, it seems. She’s not the first to hold unspeakable secrets in her soul.

Can she conquer her trials and tribulations, like some of them did? Or will she be defeated by life, like others?

Secrets of the Island, the second book in the Secrets trilogy, is a tale of romantic suspense that begs the question: what secrets are buried within your family tree?

I didn’t realize before I started that it’s a second book in a trilogy, but it works well as a stand alone. Although now I do want to read the previous book.

When twins Harry and Harriet return from the war, they decide to spend the summer in their grandfather’s summer home in Mackinac Island. While there, they discover an old letter written by a woman to their great-grandfather. While searching for answers, they learn secrets from three generations.

The book began little slow but once the twins move to Mackinac Island, things started to happen. We learn the many mysteries and secret from many generations, but we also see how the twins learn to live their lives after the war. Settling back into their old lives isn’t easy but slowly they start to live again.

While the book started slow, at the end I just wanted to know what happens next.

3/5

Published: Deeds Publishing (May 15, 2018)
Format: ebook
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Author

As a native Michigander, award-winning author Linda Hughes has been visiting Mackinac Island since she was a kid. Sheís spent countless hours riding a bike around the shoreline, and perusing the library and church records to learn about island history. Sheís built many a cairn, witnessed the Northern Lights on several occasions, and eaten more than her fair share of chocolate fudge. Sheís a world traveler, having worked in thirteen countries and visited a couple dozen more, but Mackinac Island remains one of her favorite places.

Her writing honors come from the National Writers Association, Writerís Digest, the American Screenwriters Association, Ippy (Independent Publishers), and Indie Book of the Day.

For more information, please visit Linda Hughes’ website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, June 6
Interview at Passages to the Past

Friday, June 8
Feature at CelticLady’s Reviews

Monday, June 11
Review at Donna’s Book Blog

Wednesday, June 13
Interview at The Writing Desk

Friday, June 15
Review at History From a Woman’s Perspective
Feature at Teaser Addicts Book Blog

Monday, June 18
Review at Donna McCabe

Wednesday, June 20
Excerpt at Susan Heim on Writing

Friday, June 22
Review at Svetlana’s Reads and Views

Monday, June 25
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Wednesday, June 27
Guest Post at Jathan & Heather

Thursday, June 28
Review, Interview & Excerpt at Two Gals and a Book

Friday, June 29
Review at Bookramblings
Review at Impressions In Ink

Before the Fall by Juliet West

Before the Fall by Juliet West

1916. Across the channel, the Great War rages; in London’s East End, with her husband away fighting, Hannah Loxwood struggles to hold everything together. She has sacrificed so much for a husband who left her behind, a husband who may never come home. Then, when she meets David – thoughtful, intelligent, quietly captivating – Hannah find herself faced with the most dangerous of temptations…

As the war grips tighter and bombs fall down upon the streets, the stakes for the couple grow ever higher. Soon Hannah and Daniel will realize just how precarious their happiness is, as their destiny rushes towards them…

Beautifully wrought, utterly compelling and with a twist that will leave you breathless, Before The Fall, inspired by a true story, hurls you into a London torn apart by the First World War and paints a vivid and haunting portrait of one woman’s struggle. (back cover)

Hannah’s husband has gone to war leaving her with their two children. She’s not happy when she has to move in with her mother, sister, and brother-in-law. Hoping to earn some extra money, Hannah takes a job at a café where she meets Daniel Blake. Working as a ship worker exempts him from war, which isn’t to everyone’s liking.

I had read a lot of good reviews about this and I had high hopes for this one. It wasn’t bad but not as good as I wanted it to be. I didn’t quite connect with any of the characters and even the ending didn’t really move me. Especially Daniel felt very distant which wasn’t helped that Hannah’s narrative was in the first person while Daniel’s was in 3rd person.

It moved too slow at times to keep my interest. But on the positive side, it did give a realistic feeling about the time.

3/5

Published: Pan Books (2017)
Format: Paperback
Pages: 326
Source: My own

Mailbox Monday 23.4.2018

Mailbox Monday was created by Marcia and is now hosted on its own blog.

Here’s what I’ve got in the last few weeks:

The Tethered Mage by Melissa Caruso (bought)
A Brief History of the Amazons: Women Warriors in Myth and History by Lyn Webster Wilde (bought)
My Mother’s Shadow by Nikola Scott (purchased)
A Bold and Dangerous Family: One Family’s Fight Against Italian Fascism by Caroline Moorehead (purchased)

The Cold Light of Dawn (The King’s Greatest Enemy 4) by Anna Belfrage

The Cold Light of Dawn (The King’s Greatest Enemy 4) by Anna Belfrage

After Henry of Lancasterís rebellion has been crushed early in 1329, a restless peace settles over England. However, the young Edward III is no longer content with being his regentsí puppet, no matter that neither Queen Isabella nor Roger Mortimer show any inclination to give up their power. Caught in between is Adam de Guirande, torn between his loyalty to the young king and that to his former lord, Roger Mortimer.

Edward III is growing up fast. No longer a boy to be manipulated, he resents the power of his mother, Queen Isabella, and Mortimer. His regents show little inclination of handing over their power to him, the rightful king, and Edward suspects they never will unless he forces their hand.

Adam de Guirande is first and foremost Edwardís man, and he too is of the opinion that the young king is capable of ruling on his own. But for Adam siding with his king causes heartache, as he still loves Roger Mortimer, the man who shaped him into who he is.

Inevitably, Edward and his regents march towards a final confrontation. And there is nothing Adam can do but pray and hope that somehow things will work out. Unfortunately, prayers donít always help.

The Cold Light of Dawn is the fourth in Anna Belfrageís series, The Kingís Greatest Enemy, the story of a man torn apart by his loyalties to his lord and his king.

Edward III is growing up fast and the relationship between him and Mortimer, and Isabella, is growing more strained every day. Adam is finding it more and more difficult to balance his loyalty to both his king and to the man who is like a father to him.

This was supposed to be the last book in the series but apparently there might be a chance it isn’t. I’m really hoping it isn’t because I loved this book and I want to know what happens now. Do they reconcile?

I’ve never been a fan of Mortimer and this series hasn’t changed that. And I still don’t understand Adam’s unyielding loyalty for him, but I feel bad for Adam about how things went down. But he must have known that any other outcome isn’t possible…

I loved how much Thomas we have here. And I’m glad Edmund was never the heir to the throne… or king….

4,5

Published: Matador & TimeLight Press (February 16, 2018)
Format: ebook
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Author

Anna was raised abroad, on a pungent mix of Latin American culture, English history and Swedish traditions. As a result sheís multilingual and most of her reading is historical- both non-fiction and fiction. Possessed of a lively imagination, she has drawers full of potential stories, all of them set in the past. She was always going to be a writer ñ or a historian, preferably both. Ideally, Anna aspired to becoming a pioneer time traveller, but science has as yet not advanced to the point of making that possible. Instead she ended up with a degree in Business and Finance, with very little time to spare for her most favourite pursuit. Still, one does as one must, and in between juggling a challenging career Anna raised her four children on a potent combination of invented stories, historical debates and masses of good food and homemade cakes. They seem to thriveÖ

For years she combined a challenging career with four children and the odd snatched moment of writing. Nowadays Anna spends most of her spare time at her writing desk. The children are half grown, the house is at times eerily silent and she slips away into her imaginary world, with her imaginary characters. Every now and then the one and only man in her life pops his head in to ensure sheís still there.

Other than on her website, www.annabelfrage.com, Anna can mostly be found on her blog, http://annabelfrage.wordpress.com ñ unless, of course, she is submerged in writing her next novel. You can also connect with Anna on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, February 26
Review at Historical Fiction Reviews

Tuesday, February 27
Guest Post at Let Them Read Books

Wednesday, February 28
Review at A Holland Reads

Thursday, March 1
Feature at What Is That Book About

Friday, March 2
Review at Book Drunkard

Monday, March 5
Review at A Bookaholic Swede

Tuesday, March 6
Review at Beth’s Book Nook Blog

Wednesday, March 7
Review at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!

Friday, March 9
Review at A Chick Who Reads

Monday, March 12
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Tuesday, March 13
Guest Post at Oh, for the Hook of a Book!

Thursday, March 15
Feature at Passages to the Past

Friday, March 16
Interview at Dianne Ascroft’s Blog

Monday, March 19
Review at So Many Books, So Little Time

Wednesday, March 21
Review at Svetlana’s Reads and Views
Feature at A Literary Vacation

Thursday, March 22
Review at Back Porchervations

Friday, March 23
Feature at Button Eyed Reader

Monday, March 26
Review at Just One More Chapter

Wednesday, March 28
Review at Broken Teepee
Review at Impressions In Ink

Friday, March 30
Review at Bookramblings

Mailbox Monday (26.3.2018)

Mailbox Monday was created by Marcia and is now hosted on its own blog.

I haven’t posted mailbox for ages but here’s what I’ve got in the last few weeks:


The Confessions of Young Nero by Margaret George (bought)
Deceptions by Kelley Armstrong (bought)
The Court of Broken Knives by Anna Smith Spark (purchased)
Godblind by Anna Stephens (purchased)
Sea of Shadows by Kelley Armstrong (bookmooch)

For the Winner by Emily Hauser

For the Winner by Emily Hauser

Some three thousand years ago, in a time before history, the warriors of Greece journeyed to the ends of the earth in the greatest expedition the world had ever seen. One woman fought alongside them.
When the king of Pagasae left his infant daughter on the slopes of a mountain to die, he believed he would never see her again. But Atalanta, against the will of the gods and the dictates of the Fates, survived – and went on to bring to life one of the greatest legends of all of ancient Greece…

Teaching herself to hunt and fight, Atalanta is determined to prove her worth to her father and, disguising herself as a man, she wins a place on the greatest voyage of that heroic age: the journey of Jason and the Argonauts to the very ends of the known world in search of the legendary Golden Fleece. But Atalanta is discovered, and abandoned in the mythical land of Colchis, where she is forced to make a choice that will determine her place in history – and change her life forever.

Here then is the legend of Jason and the Argonauts as never told before: the true story of the princess who became a warrior, who sailed and fought alongside Jason and Theseus and Peleus, father of Achilles, and who ultimately ran a race that would decide her destiny. Based on the myths of the ancient Greeks, For the Winner brings alive an archaic world where the gods can transform a mortal’s life on a whim, where warrior heroes carve out names that will echo down the ages . . . and where one woman fights to determine her own fate. (publisher)

As a baby, Atalanta was abandoned on Mount Pelion during a storm but rescued by a peasant family who raises her as their own. She grows up to be a tomboy learning to use the bow and hunting. After learning that she was adopted, she sets about learning the truth about her true family.

I have to confess that I’ve never heard of Atalanta or Jason and the Argonauts before reading this. My knowledge of ancient Greece is limited but still, I probably should have even heard about this before… This was my first Hauser book even though I own her first book For the Most Beautiful.

I really liked Atalanta who was strong, clever and capable of protecting herself. At first, she wants to just find her father and prove herself to him but getting to know ruthless Jason, she wants the crown to protect the people knowing she would be a fairer ruler.

I liked the scenes on Mount Olympus showing gods plotting and interfering in human affairs. This portrayal was how I always think about them. I blame Xena: Warrior Princess for that…

4/5

Published: Transworld (July 25, 2017)
Format: ebook
Source: NetGalley

An Argument of Blood (Oath and Crown 1) by J.A. Ironside, Matthew Willis

An Argument of Blood
by J.A. Ironside & Matthew Willis

William, the nineteen-year-old duke of Normandy, is enjoying the full fruits of his station. Life is a succession of hunts, feasts, and revels, with little attention paid to the welfare of his vassals. Tired of the young dukeís dissolute behaviour and ashamed of his illegitimate birth, a group of traitorous barons force their way into his castle. While William survives their assassination attempt, his days of leisure are over. Heíll need help from the king of France to secure his dukedom from the rebels.

On the other side of the English Channel lives ten-year-old ∆lfgifa, the malformed and unwanted youngest sister to the Anglo-Saxon Jarl, Harold Godwinson. ∆lfgifa discovers powerful rivalries in the heart of the state when her sister Ealdgyth is given in a political marriage to King Edward, and she finds herself caught up in intrigues and political manoeuvring as powerful men vie for influence. Her path will collide with Williamís, and both must fight to shape the future.

An Argument of Blood is the first of two sweeping historical novels on the life and battles of William the Conqueror.

When we first get to know William the Conqueror, he’s young and, honestly, not very likeable. He’s still learning to be duke and how to keep his dukedom. Ælfgifa is the youngest sister of Harold Godwinson, deformed and unloved especially by her mother, she has learned to read people and becomes skilled in the political game.

I’m not huge fan of William and he wasn’t very likeable here either, but he did have his moments. It was interesting to see him as a spoiled and selfish teen. That’s not necessarily how I’ve been seeing him, but it made interesting to read.

I loved Ælfgifa and I waited for her chapters. There isn’t much known about her so there’s lot more freedom writing about her. She’s intelligent and clever and gives refreshing side to the Saxon world. I really want to know how her story will develop.

3,5

Published: Penmore Press (June 19, 2017)
Format: ebook
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Authors

J.A. Ironside (Jules) grew up in rural Dorset, surrounded by books – which pretty much set he up for life as a complete bibliophile. She loves speculative fiction of all stripes, especially fantasy and science fiction, although when it comes to the written word, she’s not choosy and will read almost anything. Actually it would be fair to say she starts to go a bit peculiar if she doesnít get through at least three books a week. She writes across various genres, both adult and YA fiction, and itís a rare story if there isnít a fantastical or speculative element in there somewhere.

Jules has had several short stories published in magazines and anthologies, as well as recorded for literature podcasts. Books 1 and 2 of her popular Unveiled series are currently available with the 3rd and 4th books due for release Autumn/ Winter 2017.

She also co-authored the sweeping epic historical Oath and Crown Duology with Matthew Willis, released June 2017 from Penmore Press.

Jules now lives on the edge of the Cotswold way with her boyfriend creature and a small black and white cat, both of whom share a god-complex.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Matthew Willis is an author of historical fiction, SF, fantasy and non-fiction. In June 2017 An Argument of Blood, the first of two historical novels about the Norman Conquest co-written with J.A. Ironside, was published. In 2015 his story Energy was shortlisted for the Bridport short story award.

Matthew studied Literature and History of Science at the University of Kent, where he wrote an MA thesis on Joseph Conrad and sailed for the University in national competitions. He subsequently worked as a journalist for Autosport and F1 Racing magazines, before switching to a career with the National Health Service.

His first non-fiction book, a history of the Blackburn Skua WW2 naval dive bomber, was published in 2007. He now has four non fiction books published with a fifth, a biography of test pilot Duncan Menzies, due later in 2017. He currently lives in Southampton and writes both fiction and non-fiction for a living.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, January 15
Review at Jaffa Reads Too

Tuesday, January 16
Feature at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, January 17
Review at Historical Fiction Reviews

Friday, January 19
Feature at A Bookaholic Swede

Monday, January 22
Review at Broken Teepee

Tuesday, January 23
Review at Pursuing Stacie

Friday, January 26
Feature at Let Them Read Books

Monday, January 29
Review at Locks, Hooks and Books

Tuesday, January 30
Feature at What Cathy Read Next

Wednesday, January 31
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Thursday, February 1
Feature at The Lit Bitch

Friday, February 2
Review at Bookramblings
Review at Impressions In Ink

Monday, February 5
Review at Back Porchervations

Tuesday, February 6
Review at Svetlana’s Reads and Views

Wednesday, February 7
Review at The Writing Desk
Review at Donna’s Book Blog