Beyond the Wild River by Sarah Maine

Beyond the Wild River by Sarah Maine

The day comes sooner than expected when Charles, prompted by a near-scandal between Evelyn and a servant, brings her on a business trip to New York City and the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago. Evelyn welcomes the chance to escape her cloistered life and see the world.

But a fishing expedition up the Nipigon River in Canada takes an unexpected turn when Evelyn discovers that their river guide is none other than James Douglas. Even more startling, her father betrays no shock, simply instructing Evelyn not to reveal their past connection with James to the rest of their party.

Evelyn never believed that James was guilty, but speculation about her father’s role in the killing has made her fearful. What is he hiding? As they travel deeper into the wilderness, and further from the constraints of polite society, the secrets and lies surrounding that night are finally stripped away, revealing the true natures of everyone in their party. (publisher)

A poacher is killed on a Scottish estate and James Douglas is accused of the murder. He flees to Canada where he works as a guide. Five years later Evelyn Ballentyre is accused of becoming too close with their stable hand and her father Charles takes her with him to the Canadian wilderness. Once there, they discover that their guide is none other than James Douglas who used to work on their estate. The story moves between past and present as we learn more about the poacher’s death.

I was intrigued by this book once I noticed it’s set in Canada because I haven’t read many books set in there. Throw in some Scotland and what’s not to like?

The middle part was a bit slow going but once things started to happen, it does pick up. But the end felt a bit rushed like trying to cram up all the happenings in the end.

Evelyn was ok but I didn’t really connect with her. Her friend Clementina was just silly but I did like James. I would have liked to learn more about how he worked his way to Canada.
I didn’t buy all the situations that Evelyn had as a woman living in the 1800’s.

I liked the murder mystery and thought it wrapped up good in the end. We learn more about Charles as the mystery is revealed.

In the end, it was an okay and quick read but I felt like it could have been so much more.

3/5

Published: Atria (April 18, 2017)
Format: ebook
Source: Publisher

The Witchfinder’s Sister by Beth Underdown

The Witchfinder’s Sister by Beth Underdown

‘Do you believe in the devil? Not so long ago I too would have scoffed. Now – now I am not so sure.’

1645. Alice Hopkins returns in disgrace, husbandless and pregnant, to her brother Matthew’s house in the small Essex town of Manningtree.

When she left, Matthew was an awkward boy, bullied for the scars that disfigure his face. But the brother Alice has come back to is like a different person. Now Matthew has powerful friends, and mysterious business that keeps him out late into the night. Then the rumours begin: whispers of witchcraft, and of a great book, in which Matthew is gathering women’s names.

Just how far will Matthew’s obsession drive him? And what choice will Alice make, when she finds herself at the very heart of his plan? (publisher)

After the death of her husband, Alice Hopkins has no other choice than to return to her childhood home in Manningtree to live with her brother Matthew. But a lot has happened there while she was away and her brother has changed. They haven’t been in contact for years and Matthew didn’t approve her choice of husband and still hasn’t forgiven her.

Little by little Alice discovers that it is Matthew who is behind hunting women and accusing them of witchcraft. But she is horrified when she realizes that Matthew wants her to join him in the quest to find witches.

The first part of the book was really slow and boring so I was thinking about quitting but I still wanted to know how it ends. I mean all the action was in the latter half of the book.

I wasn’t huge fan of Alice and just didn’t connect with her. I just wished she had more backbone. She was too easily influenced by what others think and would agree with them. Then someone else says this and then she agrees with them and so on. She did got little better at the end and I was happy about the ending. I didn’t get why she would tell Matthew about her pregnancy. It probably wouldn’t have made him any warmer or anything but still.

Matthew well… he had his reasons sort of… He is evil person who truly believes in the existence of witches. He really does believe he is doing the right thing. He is not a nice person, I’ll just leave it there.

I have to say I didn’t like this as much as I thought I would but everyone else seems to love this so what do I know. But I was just bored and not scared.

2,5/5

Published: Viking (March 16, 2017)
Format: ebook
Source: Netgalley

Mailbox Monday (3.4.2017)

Mailbox Monday was created by Marcia and is now hosted on its own blog.

Here’s what I got last week:


Under the Approaching Dark by Anna Belfrage (for review)
Unfinished Tales of Númenor and Middle-earth by J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (purchased)
The Girl in the Glass Tower by Elizabeth Fremantle (purchased)